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Learn your compass – Part 3

 

5 Tips for Beginners

  1. Make sure that the Direction of Travel Arrow is pointing away from your body, and in the direction you want to go.
    Compass 4 Learn your compass   Part 3
    Always make sure that you have the Orienting Arrow aligned with Grid North (the top of the map), irrespective of the direction in which you are heading. It’s easy to make an error if the map is folded.
  2. Remember that the magnetic Compass needle does not point in your intended direction of travel. Stick to where the Direction of Travel Arrow is pointing, once you have taken a bearing.
    cow Learn your compass   Part 3
  3. Make sure that the landmark you choose to head for is a fixed feature that doesn’t move – pick a tree, gate post, or boulder, for example, rather than a cow, sheep, person or bird!
  4. Make sure your compass isn’t near any metal objects when following a bearing, such as a Trig point or a metal gate post, as they may affect the magnetic compass needle.
  5. Make sure your compass isn’t near any metal objects when following a bearing, such as a Trig point or a metal gate post, as they may affect the magnetic compass needle.
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Learn your compass – Part 2

Parts of a Compass

Compasses now come in all shapes, styles and sizes and, as with everything, you get what you pay for. A cheap one is almost guaranteed to let you down – and no one wants to be in a situation when that happens.

The compass I would recommend is the Silva Exhibition 4 as illustrated below.

And, so that you can fully understand the capabilities of your compass, we’ve broken down exactly what each component means

compass v3 265x176 Learn your compass   Part 2

  1. Base plate– this is the clear compass bed, with straight edges to line up your direction of travel.  It also has rulers and map scales on it to help you measure distance.
  2. Compass housing– this rotating bezel, with degrees etched on its perimeter to enable you to take a bearing, also holds the magnetic needle.
  3. Compass needle– the red and white needle floats in a clear liquid so it can rotate freely. The red end always points to Magnetic North.
  4. Orienting arrow– this is the wide red arrow marked on the bed of the compass housing. Align the red part of the compass needle with this arrow when taking a bearing off the map.
  5. Orienting lines– these lines are also marked on the bed of the compass housing, and they are parallel to the Orienting Arrow.  The Orienting lines are used to line up with the Northings on a map to establish a bearing.
  6. Index line– a compass bearing is read off the Index line on the bezel.
  7. Direction of travel arrow– this thin black arrow on the base plate is used to indicate the direction in which you will be travelling after taking your bearing.
  8. Compass Romer – these are marked on the base plate to help you measure distances on a variety of map scales. They are also handy in helping you to accurately work out your six-figure grid reference.
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How to read a compass – Part 1

The Three Norths

A compass is an amazing piece of kit… when you know how to use it!  Whatever you’re doing outdoors – hiking up a mountain or navigating on an adventure race – reading a compass properly not only keeps you on the right track but could, ultimately, save your life.

At Tri Adventure, we know how important navigating and compass reading is to plotting routes and finding your way round the track. So, to make things a little easier for you, we’ve created a three-part series to compass reading, so you know your Magnetic North from Grid North, and can take your adventure racing to the next level.

 

compass 1 265x177 How to read a compass – Part 1
The compass needle always points to Magnetic North. What is Magnetic North? Why are there three Norths, and what are the differences? It can get a little confusing, so let’s keep it simple.

The first is TRUE NORTH – this is a fixed point where the geographical North Pole is located, and where the Earth’s Longitude Lines meet.  Its reference isn’t used when navigating with a map but it’s still useful to know.

The second one is GRID NORTH. This is not a fixed point; it’s essentially the top of your map towards which the North-South grid lines run in parallel to one another.  Where each line ends at the top of the map is where GRID NORTH is.  GRID NORTH was created by laying a rectangular grid over the whole of the UK.  This is where Grid Referencing comes from.

The third and final north is MAGNETIC NORTH. This is a moving point, influenced by the movement of the Earth’s liquid magma (the stuff which comes out of volcanoes). The compass needle points to MAGNETIC NORTH, and it is governed by the magnetic field of the earth.

Pick up any navigation map and the key will indicate the variation between Magnetic North and Grid North in the area you want to travel.

If you use the needle of a compass in conjunction with the Grid North of a map to identify your intended direction of travel, you can’t go far wrong.

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12 hour Adventure Racing

 

Making the Step Up to a 12hr race, by Tom Davies

web 9415 12 hour Adventure Racing

So, you’ve seen an advert for a 12 hour race, but you’re worried that it’s a big step up from the 2 or 4 hour races you’ve been doing? Scared that it’s too much to take on? Read on…..

Entering your first long race is scary, that’s for sure. When James and I entered the 12 hour Dynamic DARE a quite a few years ago, it was the longest race that either of us had done, by a long way. I think we had both done a 6-hour Questars or two, but that was about it. The thought of going non-stop for 12 hours was terrifying. As it turns out, the reality was quite different!

As nearly all adventure races are run on a “score” concept, it’s perfectly fine to do as much or as little as you want to (or can) do. There will be mandatory sections or checkpoints in every race, but it’s up to you how much extra you do in addition to these mandatory sections. Better at running than biking? Then focus on the running sections and cut the biking sections short to give you time to do this, or vice versa. Play to your strengths!

We had a great day out in the Wye Valley during that first long race. You may think it’s not going to be possible to run and bike all day without getting worn out, but the reality is that you wind the pace back considerably from the frantic sprint-race pace that you’ll be accustomed to seeing at 2 or 4-hour races. It’s ok to walk up hills! Your focus changes from going flat-out to ensuring that you last the distance. Just make sure you eat regularly in order to keep your energy up – my rule is to eat something every half an hour, whether you are hungry or not.

There are several benefits to doing longer races.

  • They are usually better value for money in terms of cost per hour of racing.
  • As said before, you get to eat like a pig with no repercussions!
  • As the race is longer, you get to head further away from civilisation into truly wild areas, often visiting some of the most beautiful parts of the country.
  • Best of all, long races often include special stages, where you’ll get to do something exciting, different or scary (or possibly all three!).

In the past I’ve abseiled off the 70m overhang at Kinsey Crag (Terrex Swift race in the Yorkshire Dales), shot arrows at archery targets (HARZ race in Germany and the DARE race in the Wye Valley), canoed down the rapids at Symonds Yat (DARE race again), jumped off a cliff into a flooded quarry (Open5 in the Lake District), and loads more.

Doing longer races also usually means that you’ll be racing as a pair or a team – the only thing I’ll say here is to make sure you race with people that you like! I’ve discovered that it’s perfectly possible for some people (mentioning no names) to talk non-stop for 12 hours. Dependant on the pain level that you are experiencing at the time, this may be a good thing or a bad thing!

Racing as a pair or team is great as you get to share the good times with your team mates, and when times are bad and you are tired and grumpy, there’s someone there to feed you, carry your pack, tow you up a hill or just provide a word of support. Alternatively, you can just blame them for getting you lost if they are the one doing the navigation at that point!

When we finished the DARE race, we thought we’d done pretty badly, as we’d had a few ups and downs, and had spent the day going so much slower than we were used to racing. When the results came out, it turns out we’d done alright, and had just about sneaked into the top 10, with which we were delighted (and surprised!). It turns out that everyone else had also had a nightmare at some point of the race as well, and my experience since then has been that if you just keep going, you’ll end up doing OK, as everyone else will be experiencing exactly the same problems as you.

In summary then, give it a go!

In the words of the Dr Pepper advert, what’s the worst that can happen?!

Enter the Tri-Adventure 12hr Night and Day today!

NightDay High Res 265x70 12 hour Adventure Racing

12hr Night&Day

16th/17th July  

10pm – 10am – Pairs or Solo (£90pp)

Test your stamina with this 12hour adventure race incorporating day and night navigation. A stunning non-stop eventbover 5 stages, incorporating trail running, mountain biking and night navigation – as well as some surprise Activities!

Location: Start and Finish in Effingham, Surrey  Time: Registration opens from 7pm, event starts at 10pm

Enter online today –

 

 

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Love your map

5 reasons we love maps

IMG 1506 265x177 Love your map

1. Maps showcase what’s around you

If you follow the Google maps on your phone or set the sat-nav to your desired destination, chances are you’re going to miss an awful lot. That beautiful lake just half a mile away from where you stopped for lunch, or the view point atop a nearby hill… Maps provide a clear, aerial view that’s much wider, so when you’re in planning phase, you can spot hidden gems and make the time to explore if you want to. It’s as much about the journey as the destination, and maps play a big part in that.

2. Charging batteries and getting a signal are of no concern

Very little is needed in the way of explanation here. Having a traditional paper map saves all sorts of potential bother if your batteries die or a signal fails you at a crucial moment. You certainly don’t want to fall victim to technology failure without a back up – having a map with you, even as a back up, solves the problem.

3. It’s an essential safety skill ticked off

You never know when map reading might come in handy and that’s why it’s important to keep a map in your backpack, in your hand, or fixed to a map board on your MTB. Being able t read and navigate from a map is an essential safety skill, which is why we offer Navigation courses every month (link to page on site) – avoid having all the gear and no idea.

Image 4 265x177 Love your map4. Maps provide awareness and appreciation of your surroundings

Maps are designed to be used in conjunction with the real, physical world. Whether it’s reading a sign, spotting a big hill or distinguishing a path from a bridleway, they’re designed to keep your senses engaged and active so you are aware of everything around you. It’s these moments that often make the journey – the ability to look around and enjoy the beauty of the moment you’re in, and maps not only allow, but encourage, that.

5. Maps can’t be blamed

We’ve all been there – the sat nav or Google maps takes us along a route that we know deep down is wrong… but we follow it anyway. We trust technology over our own instincts. It’s a guilt-free way of messing up – just blame the gear. This approach is, sadly, fairly normal but that doesn’t make it any less idiotic. Maps are our partner in crime, they are equals to our intellect and common sense, not replacements, and they are not wrong.

 

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Virgin London Marathon – Chasing the Sub 3 hour

Sunday April 24th was the 36th running of the London Marathon.

4 199x265 Virgin London Marathon   Chasing the Sub 3 hour
I knew this race was on the cards for about a year since I had a Good For Age (GFA) place from achieving 3h01m07s in Hamburg a couple of years ago.  The preparation for this event had not been solid since my priorities had been with my businesses.  Still I had been on a number of social runs with my running club, Clapham Chasers (Chasers). The first aim was to achieve another GFA time, then to beat 3h01m07s to get a PB, and if all goes well to get under 3 hours for the first time.

Race day and I felt good. I really wasn’t sure how the day would go, but I knew I had to go for the target of running under 3 hours, 6m52s per mile.  This was my 20th Marathon and I had been close to going under 3 hours a couple of times.  I saw a couple of my club mates at the start but chose to run on my own as I focused on starting at a steady pace and not going to fast at the start.

I had my GPS watch on which I started on the line, I also ensured I went over the line on 30s past the start to help keep track on my progress through the course clocks.

The first half went well and just before Tower Bridge I caught a Club Mate Alex and we ran to a great reception over Tower Bridge, through Half way in 1h27m and on to fourteen and a half miles where we would see our Chasers support crew near Westferry.  This is a great spot that offers supporters 3 points of contact on the course.

Things were going well and I felt fine.  The crowds reduce a little through Docklands but I was able to keep a good pace through to the next Chaser contact point at twenty-one miles.  It is great to hear all the support again and to be on the last ‘home straight’.

I had not looked at my watch after half way since the GPS was throwing all my timings out with the poor signal.  I felt fine and knew I just had to hold position and run well.

I knew from my recce of the course I needed to be at 23 miles before 2h38m to be on a 3 hour pace.  Iwent through in 2h 37m on their clock so I knew it was still going well.  Soon after this I was caught by the 3 hour pace group. I didn’t allow this to phase me.

Again the support was amazing all the way to the end.  I spotted Jasmine, an former colleague who was managing the Lucazade Station.  Not far now.  I made it to 800m to go which is where the 26 mile marker is.  the clock said 2h57m.  I knew it was going to be close and required a push to the finish.  I turned into The Mall and heard the last 3 hour pacer cross the line on 2h59m59s.  I knew I had 30 seconds to sprint to the line.  When it cam in to view the clock was reading 3h00m10s.  I had 20s to make it, and it took me 22s, giving me a time of 3h00m02s.  I was not aware of my actual time at this point, but was pleased, I had managed a PB and had enjoyed the run. Also the GFA time will allow me automatic entry again next year.

I saw my former boss at the finish who manages the directing of us finishers.  I have also worked this section before and it is a great place to work with so many happy people.

It wasn’t until I caught up with Liz that I was told that i was only 2 seconds over the 3 hours!  oops, so close, yet so confident that I can run faster next time.

Great event and lots of Chaser Support. Thanks!

5 265x213 Virgin London Marathon   Chasing the Sub 3 hour

3 198x265 Virgin London Marathon   Chasing the Sub 3 hour

The following week was used to restock with calories.  Starting off with a free burger, or 2, at GBK for my efforts.2 265x265 Virgin London Marathon   Chasing the Sub 3 hour

I knew I could have pushed it a little harder on race day.  The whole run went really well.

I was keen to test my legs the following week by entering the Richmond Half which I successfully achieved in 1h24m28s.1 199x265 Virgin London Marathon   Chasing the Sub 3 hour

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Devizes to Westminster – A long paddle

IMG 1711b 265x143 Devizes to Westminster   A long paddle
Devizes to Westminster map 265x90 Devizes to Westminster   A long paddleDevizes – Westminster, 125 miles, 77 portages – www.dwrace.org.uk

Thursday 24th March, 36 hours before the start
I was at home watching TV when a message was put out on social media by a friend of mine in Afghanistan saying that a sick paddler had let a mate down ahead of the 68th Devizes to Westminster (DW) kayak event starting some 36 hours later.  A replacement was eagerly being hunted for. With no major plans over the Easter Break, it didn’t take me long to put my honest bid in, saying that I was a bit rusty but was keen to step in.  It had been quite a while since I had last sat in a sea kayak, actually over 4 years, and I would have to borrow a paddle. With plenty of previous Adventure Race experience, I was not afraid to take on this classic endurance race of 125 miles and 77 portages for teams in double kayaks or canoes.  I had heard of the event before but had no knowledge of the route or timings other than a bench mark achievement is to complete it under 24 hours.

I soon found out that I was on!  I managed a brief chat on the phone at 10pm with Boris, my race partner to be, agreeing to meet at Richmond Canoe Club the following morning for a quick compatibility test paddle to see if we could actually paddle together.

Friday 23rd March, 21 hours before the start
11am I met Boris for the first time at the Richmond Canoe Club, a tall well built guy in excess of 100kg.  Boris had developed his physique through years of rowing and swimming.  Boris had rowed for Oxford in three Oxford/Cambridge boat races which included a victory.  He had also swum the Channel on 4 separate occasions and had completed the DW last year in a little over 26 hours.  I sure knew I had my work cut out to meet any expectations.  We were also joined by RCC Coach Peter, who sorted us a nice tippy K2 kayak, something I had never been in before, a paddle, spray deck and buoyancy aid to use for the event.  Boris had only ever sat in the back before, with the steering in the front and, given Boris’s previous experience of the route, we switched this round and hit the water for a 20 minute paddle.  To be honest, after an initial nervous shaky start we were soon flying along the Thames.  Before it could all fall apart we got out and fixed the boat on the roof of the car ready for the journey to Devizes.  I had just enough time to go and buy some neoprene booties to wear, a hydration backpack and a ton of food that would take my fancy and fuel me during the event, which Peter and Boris judged would be about 26 hours.

Friday 23rd March, 12 hours before the start
With the sick paddler dropping out, Boris had also lost half of his support crew for the event.  The support is very important in a successful event as they are responsible for restocking us with food and water along the way as well as for communicating our progress.  Fortunately, Boris’s wife Vanessa was persuaded to step in at last minute and team up with the original support Mark.  Due to the earlier paddler shout out, Toby was also up for the crack and came along to support.  So, 12 hours before the start we were at our overnight stop, Mark’s house, a 30 minute drive from the Start which is in Devizes.  After lashings of home made lasagne, it was a quick chat through the logistics before getting some kip.

Saturday 24th March, The Start
This race attracted 136 double kayaks or canoes and, once we’d passed the mandatory kit check, organisers allow teams to start when they like from 06:00am.  A start time is calculated by the crews backwards to coincide with the tidal lock at Teddington some 108 miles away. Organisers will only let you through this point after high tide so the flow is in the direction of travel for the last 12 miles from 04:20am. With our 26 hour plan, we wanted to be conservative and make sure we had the best chance to complete this challenge due to the rapid nature of our prep.  So, we opted for a 07:49am start.  We were off in the Tangerine Dream! Amazing, we had made it this far. The forecast for this early Easter was for 40mph winds from the SW and a cool 10 degrees with 2 weather fronts blowing over us during the day.

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The start in Devizes

We soon found our rhythm on the first long unbroken stretch of flat canal and settled in to a nice pace.  We arranged to see our crew after the first hour for a quick thumbs up that everything was ok, which it was and we were on a similar time to Boris’s previous year’s Race time of 26h03m.  During this first part of the paddle, Boris was able to give me the heads up on what to expect over the next 24 hours as I was paddling this event blind.  What makes this paddle race unique are the 77 portages en route.  This is where the canal hits a lock system and the teams have to stop, get out and carry their Kayak or canoe over to the other end to continue their journey. This was something we had not practiced and each portage is unique.  Some were quite high to get out of and required standing in the boats.  The first few did cost us a bit of time but we soon found an effective way to tackle each one.  After some time into the event, these portages offered a welcome break from the paddling and allowed us a quick stretch of the legs and a drink of water.  Another skill Boris had to master was the removal of the dragging weed collected on the bow after paddling over unavoidable patches.

Saturday 24th March, 3 hours in
We were going well and fast approaching the eagerly anticipated and much hyped up 400m tunnel. Boris had warned me about this tunnel; it was pitch black with the only reference point being the tiny white light at the end, the water was choppy from bounce back off both side walls, so balance was going to be tricky!  We had arranged to have our head torches on for this section and I am pleased we did.  I though before what was going to be the problem?  Well, sitting in the back all I could see was Boris’s back and this conveniently blocked me from seeing the light at the end of the tunnel for reference!  I didn’t know which way was up.  The head torch helped me fix a reference to the wall next to us and allowed us to make good progress through the tunnel.  For the next 9 hours, we would paddle along the Kennet and Avon Canal negotiating 57 portages, receiving support and supplies from our crew before arriving at our 54 mile point in Reading just as it was getting dark.  Getting dark! I remember Boris telling me that, if we hit Reading by 22:00 we would be doing well and the time was about 18:30.  Wowzers, we had been flying and found ourselves 4 hours up on our 26 hours.  Just after Reading is a mandatory 10 minute stop where teams attach lights to their boats and a kit check ensures we are ready for the tidal stretch.  We took this time to eat some pasta and enjoy some hot chocolate. Spirits were high and we discovered we were the first team to arrive there, so we had overtaken everyone who had started before us.  The super speedy kayakers start much later in the afternoon and chase the field down, timing their paddle to perfection to hit a fast flowing Thames from Teddington Lock. We, on the other hand, found ourselves is a different situation. After some calculations in my head, I figured that at the pace we were going and now heading on the flowing Thames, with fewer portages to negotiate we would be hitting Teddington about 2 hours before it opened!  We had been paddling at under 21 hour pace and we were still going strong.

IMG 1647 199x265 Devizes to Westminster   A long paddle  IMG 1648 265x199 Devizes to Westminster   A long paddle

Saturday 24th March, 12 hours in
We were going well and now had the tough mundane canal section to Reading (54 miles) behind us in ten and a half hours.  The race changes after Reading as it gets dark, very dark, and we are on the flowing and wide and meandering River Thames. Our ground speed picks up and there is a level of navigation needed as the river twists and turns and splits in places.  We chose to paddle in complete darkness and use our adapted night vision to track the banks either side of us.  The locations of the portages are less obvious and only confirmed by some dimly lit glow sticks.  We took our foot off the gas since we were so far ahead of time, and made sure we looked after ourselves and didn’t make any silly mistakes during this challenging part of the event.  We were caught by another boat from behind who had also mis-calculated their potential as we would both be held at Teddington (108 miles).  They were a bit all over the place and despite having the whole width of the Thames they managed to bump into us!  Boris really came in to his own, navigating and steering the kayak impeccably through the 20 remaining lock portages. Portages by this time are tough. Everything is quite sore and the repetitive arm strains are exaggerated by lifting the kayak with one arm and running through.  It was during two of these portages that I hit a low point in the race as my left arm was giving me so much pain in the shoulder joint.  I put it down to the lack of practice, the nature of this enduring event and the fact that we had eased off the pace a bit.  I was struggling to power on my left side.  Luckily, the pressure was off and Boris just asked me to keep with his timing.  It was thanks to Boris at one Portage that I got him to pummel my shoulder to free up what felt like a trapped nerve or strained tendon.  This helped the range of movement tremendously and we kept ourselves going towards Teddington lock.  This part of the journey took us through Henley, Marlow, and Windsor, where we saw the castle all lit up with the Queen’s standard flying.

IMG 1686 265x199 Devizes to Westminster   A long paddle  IMG 1698 265x199 Devizes to Westminster   A long paddle


Sunday 24th March, 03:40am 20 hours in

We made it to Teddington Lock 40 minutes before it opened and were greeted by our support team.  Easing up the pace during the night section was a wise move as a stop any longer than 40 mins at Teddington would have been more damaging.  It also came at a good time for us as Boris hit an energy low so we were able to comfortably stock him back up for the remaining two and a half hours and he also took a new set of warm clothes before having a sit in the warm car. I sat in the front with a couple of pain killers and a nice cup of warm blackcurrant. Mark massaged the pain out of my shoulder as we both waited for the lock to open.  It was a good feeling knowing that this last paddle on the tidal Thames would still see us comfortably get under the 24 hour mark and that all of our previous efforts were not lost.  We would be joining the Thames as it turned from its high tide at 04:20.  Hitting the Thames here 3 hours later, teams would experience a much faster flow over the remaining 17 miles.

Sunday 24th March, The last two and a half hours
We were back on our way, refuelled and pain free.  It was still dark, but we had quite a bit of urban lighting along the banks to keep us on track.  The Thames got wider and wider as we approached the city and the buildings got higher and higher.  As I mentioned, Boris was an Oxford Blue back in 1992 and he really knew this stretch of the river well.  This was also the day for the 162nd Oxford/Cambridge boat race which would take place on this same stretch on the following tide in the afternoon.  The high winds against the flow made for choppy waters. It was tough going for us and we really didn’t want any silly mistakes this far into the event.  We stopped one last time at Putney Boat club before the final push to finish under Westminster Bridge.  My GPS watch had stopped hours ago, and all I could remember is that we started at about 07:50 the previous morning.  As we approached The Houses of Parliament and Westminster Bridge came into view, I could see the towering clock tower of Big Ben with his big hand on 48 minutes.  I knew it was going to be close to the 23 hours and we put in a final push to the cheering crowds and our support team who lined the bridge.  We had made it across the line, it was such an amazing achievement and journey we had made.  We had actually done it!  Soon after we were greeted by a crew who helped us get out of the kayak, and we clambered up the Westminster steps to meet our crew.  We were tired and exhausted but you could have seen in us the satisfying sense of achievement.  I said it was going to be close, with our finishing time credited as 23h00m01s!  Were we disappointed, hell no!  We had completely exceeded all expectations and had a blast doing so.  Our result put us 34th out of the 136 who started.  Boris was keen to get home and catch the Boat Race and a nap before going to the the dinner that evening.  I was kindly dropped off at home and completely flopped out.  What a crazy 58 hours it had been.
Approaching the Finish

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The Finish

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The end of a great journey

IMG 1712 199x265 Devizes to Westminster   A long paddle IMG 1720 199x265 Devizes to Westminster   A long paddle

In conclusion
This is a great race with so much history.  Medal earners include James Cracknell, Sir Ranulph Fiennes, Paddy Ashdown, and Rebecca Stephen (British Everest Summiteer). I am so pleased to have had the opportunity to have completed it with such a top guy as Boris, and non of this could have been completed without the super support of Vanessa, Mark and Toby who got it right all the way through.  My Thanks go out to them for giving up their Easter for us.  I’m not sure I will be in a rush to return, my arms still hurt and my fingers still tingle, and this event took a lot out of me. Luckily, no one can take this achievement away from us.  If I was to put a mark down, I think I could be part of a team to achieve 20h 50m. That would require circumstances coming good on the day again.

Thanks for reading,

Yours in Adventuring,

Adam

Below is a video from the Canoe Show capturing the winning teams performance in the 2015 event.


The Strava track for the first 54 miles of our Kayak to Reading

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Tri-Adventure Race Report -Shere February 2016

Written by Charlotte Carrivick

With this final event of the winter series, myself & my tri adventure partner – Nige were ready to tackle the muddy & windy conditions which the beautiful surrey hills were throwing at us.

The winter series had started off in Peaslake, where we had a terrible event, navigation was shocking, we bypassed a checkpoint on at least 3 occasions (partly due to looking for a fence post as it was written down, when it was actually on a tree!!) on the run leg & the bike leg proved to be even worse!  On a positive we had a blast on the bikes, getting caked in mud & exploring the woodland surroundings & with cake & tea on offer at the finish what’s not to love?

The second event started in Effingham & proved to be a huge turning point in regards to both navigation & our placing on the leader board.  Having been at the bottom of the first event, we went onto winning this event, steering us to a good place and hopefully in with a chance of winning the winter series.

DSC03027 265x199 Tri Adventure Race Report  Shere February 2016

The winter series has been a cold & wet one so far, however the final event was on a beautifully mild & sunny February morning taking place in Shere.

With our bikes ready in the transition area, it was time to study the maps, work out which hills/checkpoints were doable, plot the best route & drink tea.  With the run first, it was decided to spend the extra time on those checkpoints & only go for a couple on the bike.

As 10am approached, Adam (tri-adventure race director) gave us the event briefing & we all walked up the muddy bridleway to the start flags.  With the clackson sounding it was the off.  Being at the bottom of the surrey hills meant the only way was up and up and up!  The bridleway was chalky, wet & slippery, with a steep drop on one side.

Having found & dibbed in at our first checkpoint it was another steep climb up to our next one.  However, this didn’t go according plan, taking one wrong track turned out to be a costly error both in terms of time & checkpoints aimed for.  With time flying by, the course planned was changed & it was back down the hills to look for a different checkpoint before heading into transition.  With the new checkpoint being through the village of Shere, we set off greeting people out & about as we went.  With a turning off the beaten track & over the ford, our last checkpoint of the run leg for us proved to be elusive and with time ticking by we had to drop this one and return to transition, today was not going to be our day.
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Back through the village, saying hello the same people & back up to transition to peel off layers (the weather was too mild for long sleeves), grab a drink, gulp down a gel, grab bikes & it was time to hit the road before heading back to the mud & going back up more hills for the checkpoints of the bike leg.  This leg of the event proved to be more successful & the plotted checkpoints were gathered & with the wind at times pushing us backwards we made our way back to the village & into the transition area where we dibbed in for the final time of the event & the winter series.

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With all the trail & sprint participants back, the results were in & Adam took over the mic to announce today’s event winners & the overall series winners.

Missing out that checkpoint on the bridge & getting the navigation wrong proved to be our downfall & we missed out on being the sprint pairs winners by just 1 point!

Still, this has put fire in our bellies & fingers crossed we can come back stronger & tackle the autumn series with pure grit & determination.

Thank you to Adam & his team at Tri-Adventure for allowing me to use his photos.

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Princes Risborough Adventure Race

Laura & Adam’s weekend of adventure!

We are both new runners who (foolishly) signed up to do the Great North Run in September, but quickly decided we prefer woods and trails to pounding the pavements. I can usually be found on a road bike and Laura is often found on horseback, however we’ve been enjoying getting into running and exploring, going off the beaten track. We like the idea of more “adventurous” trail running events and both thought an adventure race sounded like a fun (i.e. less boring) way of training for the half marathon. However, I had no idea how to use a compass and we were both pretty rusty on map reading… We decided to get some training before our lack of navigation skills turned a short trail run into an accidental ultra marathon.

Early (for us) on Saturday 27th June, we headed out from SW London to the Chiltern Hills, near Princes Risborough where we had arranged to meet Adam of Tri-Adventure to take one of his new navigation training courses. We found him sitting in the morning sunshine outside a lovely little tea room, and after grabbing some coffee our weekend of adventure racing began!

I had a compass but I could not remember how to use it or much about reading maps. Laura was better at all of this but the pace of the course was such that I was able to keep up and interrupt with extra questions. We learnt the theory behind everything we might need the next day to compete in the trail race without getting too lost. This included: how a compass works, different types of maps, taking grid references and locating places on the map, taking and applying bearings, understanding and reading contours, reading the map, rights of way and different types of paths and geography.

After an intense morning session, we had a sandwich and cake break. Straight after we headed out into the woods to put try out our new navigation skills. Mine were still pretty shaky and as soon as I looked away from the map and looked back I was completely lost. I’d like to blame Google Maps and GPS devices that most of us have become reliant on but I suppose I was just not used to reading and following maps. As throughout the morning, Laura was getting the hang of it much more quickly than me. After a number of “err, sorry guys, can you just show me where we are, again” moments it started to become clearer and the ideas of “thumbing the map” and orientating it were beginning to make sense and more importantly, working.

We stopped a few times to take some bearings, learn about pacing to measure distances and trying to locate ourselves based on the lay of the land and any landmarks. We then tried a map thumbing, orientation and pacing exercise. This seemed to be a bit too abstract for my brain but I muddled through and eventually managed to get from point to point in the correct order.

Following this we put our skills to the test by attempting to find a few of the checkpoints that were already laid out on the course (not the ones we’d need to find the next day!). This went surprisingly well, with Laura confidently leading and I following us on the map.

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Successfully finding a checkpoint with a view!

After navigating successfully back to the car, we had reached the end of the navigation course and we were hopefully prepared for the navigation aspect of the race the next day. We were both mentally exhausted, and physically quite tired from hiking around the hills but it was a great day out and we, I especially, learnt a lot and felt much more comfortable out walking and navigating.

After a night at a nearby pub and hearty breakfast, we returned early the next morning to take part in the trail “taster” event. Initial nerves were soon eased when we arrived to meet the friendly Tri-Adventure team and competitors at the event HQ, and we were thrilled that the Adventure Racing community seemed to be encouraging to “newbies”.  We studied the map as we drank some coffee. It was already drizzling but nothing could dampen our spirits at this point. There were 10 checkpoints, and we had an hour to find as many as possible. Thinking back to what Adam had told us about contours and “running your own race”, we planned a route of about 9 KM, taking in 5 checkpoints. We contemplated trying to squeeze in a few more, but after working out timings as Adam had taught us, we decided they were just too far and to play it safe in order to try and make it back somewhere close to the time limit.

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A touch of nerves at the route planning stage?

Adam briefed all of the competitors before we headed to line up on the start line. Everyone started the event on foot, regardless of race category, and at 10am sharp (just as the heavens opened!) we were off. There were clearly some experienced racers and runners amongst the group and everyone went off at quite a pace. Despite Adam’s warnings not to get carried away by the more experienced competitors, the mass start was fairly infectious and I suspect we set a PB for the first KM before we settled down into our own rhythm and route. It’s a fairly strange sensation to start a race only for everyone to scatter in different directions, and a little unnerving, but we stuck to the route we had chosen and ploughed on.

We had no problem following the course we had set, a testament to Adam’s great training the day previously, and had great fun running through fields, along roads, up hills and scavenging around woods looking for the checkpoints. Our distances and timings worked out perfectly and we were thrilled to realise we were on the home straight somewhere close to the time limit.

Actually the HQ was tauntingly further than it appeared (no running across the golf course sadly!) so we returned just over an hour after we started (4.5 mins late), tired and soaked through, but total exhilarated. We were greeted by smiles, cake and tea and we realised that no one else had returned from our race. Perhaps our route planning had been a success? We both scored 41 points, achieving 50 points for reaching the 5 checkpoints and sadly losing 9 points for our late arrival, but not bad for a first attempt. In the end we did win our respective categories as the other racers had gone for a more substantial and ambitious run. I’d like to say it’s the taking part that counts, which is what I had planned to tell myself, but I must admit to being rather proud of both of us.

Since then, we have already entered the next Trail event, in Peaslake this Sunday, to try 2hrs of navigation and I’m longing to add a mountain bike to my bike collection so I can give the Sprint category a go. All in all, we had a great time and couldn’t recommend it enough. If we – relatively fit but certainly not fast runners, with no experience of adventure racing or proper navigation – could do it, anyone can!

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All smiles at the end of the race.

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Effingham Event – 31st May 2015

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Sunday 31st May, saw the exciting return of Tri-Adventure events under new ownership with the Effingham Adventure Race in the Surrey Hills.

The full results with splits are available on the Tri-Adventure website here as well as the link to the  Race Report.
Photos taken at the event can be found and tagged in our Facebook album here.

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